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Thread: Flying and flight school

  1. #311
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    Just Jon's Avatar
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    My instructor said that he has no problem sending me to an FAA check ride right now, so I'm really trying to focus on completing all of the requirements.

    I still have to fly the solo cross country flights. To do that, I need to take a check flight with a check instructor to make sure that I'm ready. Then my CFI will sign me off to fly them.

    I also have to fly a dual cross country flight at night and land 7 more times at night. That can be a fun flight, so I'm waiting for a really good night when we can hopefully end up landing at Midway airport at least once.

    I have about .5 hour remaining on flight by instruments, but I should be able to get that on the cross country check flight.

    And I still need 6 or 7 more hours of solo flight time; 5 of which has to be with solo cross country flying. (I have over 100 hours of total time.)

    Besides those things, I do need to practice some skills. I'm weakest with short field landings, so I need to practice those repetitively. That's probably the hardest skill to learn. I can perform everything else to the FAA standards at all times now. If you take a check ride with an examiner and land short of your chosen landing point on a short field landing, you instantly fail.
    A mile of road takes you a mile. A mile of runway takes you anywhere.

    I have landed an airplane at: 3CK, PWK, UGN, DKB, ENW, RFD, DPA, 06C, JVL, MSN, VPZ

  2. #312
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    I flew my night cross country last Saturday night from Chicago Exec. to Porter County Regional in Valparaiso, IN. We flew down the lake shore around 8pm and it was cold and clear. The city was beautiful. We flew over Northwestern, right near Wigley (they had the lights on), and we saw the United Center as we passed the south Loop. The airspace was really crowded, but it's a lot easier to see traffic at night, so it wasn't tough dodging airliners and helicopters.

    When we got to Porter County, there was a guy on an IFR approach and much farther out. He was flying a Piper Meridian, which is a fast single engine turboprop. He heard our radio calls in the pattern and graciously gave us some room, knowing that he could overtake us.

    So now I have 5 night landings left out of the 10 that the FAA requires. I'll have to do one more night flight because of that. I enjoy flying at night, but landing is pretty nerve-wracking. People, including me, tend to round-out and flare for landing too high at night. My landing at Porter County was great but back home I flared about 5 feet too high and had to recover. I need some more practice.
    A mile of road takes you a mile. A mile of runway takes you anywhere.

    I have landed an airplane at: 3CK, PWK, UGN, DKB, ENW, RFD, DPA, 06C, JVL, MSN, VPZ

  3. #313
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    I finally get to take my stage 3 check (out of 4) this weekend, if the weather is good. This test makes sure that I can fly a cross country flight before they sign off on my solo cross country flights. Once I get this done, I should be able to do my solo cross country flights and then practice for the FAA check ride. The next couple of months will be finishing up requirements and practicing. I'll have to take a mock check ride with the chief pilot at the school before I can go for the official check ride.

    Time to start studying again. I can't wait to be done. The weather has sucked for flying this winter, so I haven't had a lot of flight time.
    A mile of road takes you a mile. A mile of runway takes you anywhere.

    I have landed an airplane at: 3CK, PWK, UGN, DKB, ENW, RFD, DPA, 06C, JVL, MSN, VPZ

  4. #314
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    I took my stage 3 (of 4) test yesterday and got through it well. It took nearly 5 hours. Passing it allows my instructor to endorse me for solo cross country flights.

    I now only have my solo cross country flights (5 hours worth) and 5 more night landings to accomplish and I'll have all of the FAA requirements completed. I might need 10 minutes or so of flight solely by instruments, but I'll have to check my log book to be sure.

    Then it's practice, practice, and more practice and study a bit before I can take a mock check ride with the chief pilot. If I get through that to his satisfaction, they'll send me to a Designated Pilot Examiner for the FAA check ride.

    I can finally see the light at the end of the long tunnel. I'm now able to do everything that a private pilot must do. I only need to polish up some skills and some of the obscure knowledge.
    A mile of road takes you a mile. A mile of runway takes you anywhere.

    I have landed an airplane at: 3CK, PWK, UGN, DKB, ENW, RFD, DPA, 06C, JVL, MSN, VPZ

  5. #315
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    "obscure knowledge"! When it comes to moving through the air at 10,000 ft, is there any such thing?
    At the precipice, we change!
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  6. #316
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronny View Post
    "obscure knowledge"! When it comes to moving through the air at 10,000 ft, is there any such thing?
    There are books filled with knowledge that isn't easy to find, so there is some obscure stuff, yes. The Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) are coupled in a book with the Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM) and the book is not small. That book alone has some things that a pilot doesn't need to memorize but needs to be able to find.
    A mile of road takes you a mile. A mile of runway takes you anywhere.

    I have landed an airplane at: 3CK, PWK, UGN, DKB, ENW, RFD, DPA, 06C, JVL, MSN, VPZ

  7. #317
    Very impressive, Jon.
    "I guess I just hate the fact there is public property at all." - Mr. Raceboy.

  8. #318
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    I need to practice these today:



    They're really uncomfortable on a cold day, since the air is dense and you have to pitch up quite a bit to get the airplane to stall. I typically lose sight of the horizon at that attitude, so I'm looking to the sides and at the attitude indicator to make sure the wings are level. A low wing and a yawing moment could lead to a spin. Spins are not good. It takes a lot of concentration and effort to keep the "ball centered" and wings level so that the airplane is in coordinated flight. That means the nose is pointed towards the direction of flight and the tail is lined up with that direction.

    I don't like to do these alone, so I'm bringing an instructor. I have never spun an airplane. I have been instructed in the recovery technique, but I don't want my first accidental spin to be on my own.
    Last edited by Just Jon; 03-21-2017 at 01:31 PM.
    A mile of road takes you a mile. A mile of runway takes you anywhere.

    I have landed an airplane at: 3CK, PWK, UGN, DKB, ENW, RFD, DPA, 06C, JVL, MSN, VPZ

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