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Thread: Anyone With K-12 Online Schooling Experience?

  1. #1

    Anyone With K-12 Online Schooling Experience?

    My daughter is entering her junior year and is fed up with her public school. Fed up with the teachers and the students. She's always struggled, especially with math. She says when she asks for help, the teachers treat her like she's stupid. She's always struggled with friends and is pretty much a loner. She wants to do online schooling and there's an online public charter school that supposedly meets the same diploma requirements as her current school.

    Obviously no one here probably has experience with this particular school but just what experience anyone has in general. It's hard to tell from reviews online as there are so many agendas when it comes to education. Pro public, pro private, pro charter, yada, yada.

  2. #2
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    My brother is pretty heavily dyslexic, and he wound up homeschooling. In retrospect, that was far and away the best option for him, because public schools really can't deal with the difference in learning style that he has.

    I've just recently been diagnosed as ADD, which explains quite a lot of my difficulties in school. I'm high performing in stone areas, and barely passing in others; I was evaluated as a kid, and eventually they decided i wasn't paying attention to subjects i didn't like. So that led to all kinds of yelling and accusations, which didn't help anything.

    I don't know about online schools, but sine firm of alternative education may well be in her best interest.

    Before you do that, have her evaluated for ADHD and insist the school does an in-depth learning assessment. There are all kinds of organic (built-in) conditions that basically demand different educational styles, and she might benefit from that.

    I don't know about your state, but almost all of them have ways for you to force the issue and get her checked out.

    I can't tell you how many times i was scolded for not paying attention, or missing assignments, when in reality, I needed a very different teaching style. I am powerfully visual; verbal instruction is nearly meaningless to me, and what i have to do is take verbal discussion and convert it into a visual form i can understand, and then i can process it. Which means I'm always behind, or missing things.
    Last edited by Jared; 06-30-2018 at 02:44 PM.
    "Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect." –Mark Twain

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    Whichever way you go, look around for homeschooling groups that meet regularly every week or so. My brother was in a group that had "park day" Once a week, so the moms could talk to other adults, and the kids could be kids. They also would pool resources to hire people (usually local professionals) to teach classes.

    It worked well, almost to a kid they graduated early, a couple graduated two years early. (They had to go through a local school district that supplied the curriculum, so they graduated with a diploma and not a GED).
    "Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect." –Mark Twain

  4. #4
    Despite not being Catholic, our kids go to the Catholic schools. Public schools are too paternalistic and would not work with us to provide what our kids needed, particularly medically.

    Pete (pays through the nose, but is reasonably sure his kids are in the right place)

  5. #5
    Any private school would be a 30+ minute commute each way so that's off the table. She has her license and could drive herself but I'm not putting that kind of commuting responsibility on her, especially in winter time.

    One of her biggest reasons for wanting out of her current school is lack of friends and problems with other students. I don't like the odds of a 16 year old girl going into a new school and making friends with the right crowd. She's not in the wrong crowd now and I'm afraid it'd be easy for her to fall into the wrong one if that's the group that befriends and accepts her.

  6. #6
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    I don't know stuff about online schools, but could it be any worse than what you've described as her current situation? If she's up for it, why not? I'd be concerned more with the boredom aspect than anything else.
    At the precipice, we change!
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  7. #7
    I’m seeing claims of workloads anywhere between 1-10 hours per day. I’m afraid I’d she only averages a couple hours a day, she’ll be extremely bored.

    Told her one of the biggest rules is that she will be up early and dressed. Not wearing pajamas all day. There won’t be anyone there to hold her hand all day.

    I think we’re definitely going to start the enrollment process. There’s an online and in person info session that I plan on doing. If I see any major red flags, we won’t do it.

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